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Friday, February 22, 2013

Flooring Frustrations

The frustration from my flooring project has me wanting to shout more than a few expletives from the rooftop of my concrete dungeon.  Today is the day that we were supposed to be moving back in, and that makes me want to cry because we are so far from that point.

A few weeks ago, when we started this process, I wrote a post about the process of installing wood floors.  Well, knowing what I know now, I added this to that post:

ETA: THREE WEEKS BEFORE YOU BEGIN, GET A MOISTURE TEST DONE WHERE THEY DRILL THROUGH THE FOUNDATION TO GET THE READING, AS IT'S MORE ACCURATE.  YOUR PLANS AND COST MAY CHANGE BASED ON THE FINDINGS, AND YOU CERTAINLY WANT TO KNOW THIS BEFORE YOU BEGIN.  WE DIDN'T, AND IT WAS THE BIGGEST FRUSTRATION AND WASTE OF TIME.

ETA: DON'T WAIT TO GET A MOISTURE TEST DONE AT THIS POINT!!!!!  We did, and it was indeed moist, BUT it never dried out, and we scrambled to figure out what to do about it.  We had already had a pressure test done of the water line and the waste line to see if there were any leaks, and there were none.  So the moisture indicated that the membrane beneath the foundation is compromised, making it perceptually wet.  (A dehumidifier, as the wood flooring installers recommended, would do nothing to solve this.)  That means that we need a moisture barrier applied to the slab.  And if we would have done the moisture test three weeks in advance, then we would have gotten the moisture barrier and had a plan in place on the first day instead of waiting three weeks for it to dry out. WASTE OF TIME!!!!
His art will be forever preserved beneath a layer of moisture barrier.
The hubs spent a significant amount of time yesterday determining how to solve our problem.  Various third party professionals were brought into the mix to come up with a viable solution.  You see, you can't nail the plywood (that goes under the hardwood) into the concrete if you have a moisture barrier (looks like an epoxy glue) on the foundation because it doesn't make it airtight anymore.

And evidently, we couldn't just glue the wood right onto the concrete with the moisture barrier because it's not straight enough.  Nailing the wood makes it straighter, but, again, that's not doable.

So if none of the wood was laid yet, we would have just gone with a pre-finished engineered wood - not what I wanted, but there were some that I really liked the look of.  BUT they already laid the upstairs and the staircase.  (Can you see my frustration yet and see a few more expletives between the lines?)

This morning we finally landed on a solution.  There is an engineered wood that is unfinished that looks strikingly similar to the hardwood.  It's a little more expensive (surprisingly), but at this point, they've got me.  So they're going to do the moisture barrier and glue that wood on top and scrape and sand it just like the rest of the house.

The problem...oh yes, of course there's a problem, is that the wood won't be available for at least another week.  That pushes our finish date another 5 or so weeks.

First world problem, yes, but it still sucks.

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